School holidays at Zealandia

I had the chance to help with Zealandia’s school holiday programme on the 24th April (see my previous blog from 2016). The weather has been all over the place so while there where fungi to find they were few in number.

Zealandia staff members use Nature Watch to record what they find at Zealandia and this includes the holiday programme. Here are two groups being shown how to upload photos to Nature Watch before we hit the bush. All of these fungi were found along the Te Mahanga Track between the lower and upper reservoirs.

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Not a great photo of this little wood decay mushroom. It’s got me stumped at the moment. I had thought Heimiomyces neovelutipes but the stipe is too smooth and the gill too white I think.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma fasciculares [photo Geoff Ridley]

We only saw one fruitbody of Psilocybe weraroa. Not a great photo of this very pale blue secotioid fungus.

Psilocybe weraroa [photo Geoff Ridley]

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

A nice little group of Cyathus striatus – This larger birds nest is easy recognised by the dark brown hairy cup with a shiny fluted interior.

Cyathus striatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

I’m guessing a Mycena but only saw the one and I don’t have a specimen.

Mycen? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Another tiny white Mycena. Looking at the stipe of the larger fruitbody in the second photo I’m thinking Mycena austrororida.

Mycena austrororida? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena austrororida? [photo Geoff Ridley]

These little Mycena were growing deep inside a hole in the trunk of a standing living tree.  It is similar to Jerry Cooper’s  Mycena sp. ‘Ahuriri Reserve (PDD80918)’. See also my find of this from Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

Mycena sp. ‘Ahuriri Reserve’ [photo Geoff Ridley]

The next two photos are what is probably a little Lepiota growing in the litter around the base of a fern. It has a white spore print.

Lepiota [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lepiota [photo Geoff Ridley]

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Otari-Wilton’s Bush Annual Foray, 22 April 2018

Wow, 50 to 60 people turned up for the foray this afternoon. It was a beautiful day but the fungi didn’t live up to it as the wettish summer and autumn resulted in lots of small fruiting flushes. And today wasn’t one of them. Despite that, it was an enthusiastic group with lots of questions.

Wilton, Wellington, looking across the Otari Native Plant Museum. Evening post (Newspaper. 1865-2002) :Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post newspaper. Ref: 1/2-088441-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22916054

The forayers met at the house in the middle of the photo above which is now the Leonard Cockayne Centre.

Immediately outside the back door to the Centre was a small group of Psathyrella corrugis – a typical woodchip fungus in the Native Garden.

Psathyrella corrugis [photo Geoff Ridley]

All at several spots around the native garden was another woodchip fungus – Parasola leiocephala – a typical coprinoid parasol fungus. There was also one very small group of Leratiomyces ceres which is generally fruiting all through the Native Garden at this time of the year.

Parasola leiocephala [photo Geoff Ridley]

At the north end of the Information Centre is a grove of podocarps which includes Podocarpus totara. Growing on the lower trunk of this specimen is the tiny mushrooms of Mycetinis curraniae. The question arose why only on the lower trunk? My only suggestion is that this part of the tree stays damp the longest so promotes the growth of this bark decomposing fungus.

Mycetinis curraniae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Over in the Fernery, the last sad remains of an Agrocybe parasitica fruitbody quietly decomposes. This fruitbody was growing from the base of a living Beilschmiedia tawa that has been consistently producing fruitbodies every year for the last twelve years.

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

In the bush behind the Alpine garden is log which has consistently produced fruitbodies Lentinellus novae-zelandiae, the native shiitake, for the last twelve years. However, on this visit, there was only one to be seen.

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Just off the path, below the concrete retaining wall at the edge of the car park was a standing dead tree with Auricularia cornea and also a fallen branch with Favolaschia calocera.

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

We ran out of time so didn’t go down the track to the waterfall however during my reconnaissance on Saturday, 21 April, I saw Clitocybe nebularis and ….

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Geoff Ridley]

… one sad old Macrolepiota clelandii. This is the only place in the Bush that I have seen this species and my son saw a bigger fruiting in the same place three weeks ago (31 March), his pictures are below.

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Geoff Ridley]

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Lachlan Ridley]

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Lachlan Ridley]

Note that all my photos in this post were taken 21 April.

Otari-Wilton’s Bush Annual Foray, 28 May 2017

 

This year the foray was held on a cold damp day in May rather than April. This year has been cooler and consistently wetter then the last couple of years. This has meant that fungi have been fruiting sporadically over a much longer period of time. Here is what we say today.

Southern Beech Grove

This is the first Cortinarius / Thaxterogater found at Otari-Wilton’s bush.

Cortinarius epiphaeus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Plant Collection below the Cockayne Lookout

The fungi in the plant collection garden are all growing in the thick wood mulch used in this area,

Psathyrella sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lycoperdon perlatum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lepiota aspera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Kauri Lawn and Fernery

Leratiomyces erythrocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Crucibulum laevae [photo Geoff Ridley]

This Psathyrella has a faintly reddish tinge to the gill margin and the cap is hygrophanous. Possibly around Psathyrella corrugis.

Psathyrella aff. corrugis [photo Geoff Ridley]

Armillaris novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Stump with Armillaria novae-zelandia, Favolaschia calocera, Auricularia cornea, and a small Ganoderma [photo Geoff Ridley]

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coprinellus disseminatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera and Auricularis corneus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Heimiomyces neovelutipes [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Circular Walk Below the Bowling Club

Hohenbuehelia or Resupinatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Read about the foray in the Otari – Wilton’s Bush Trust News and Views, September 2017

What Colenso might have seen

Mt Bruce is a legendary in New Zealand biology as it was the place that the takahe, thought extinct but rediscovered in 1948, was brought back from the brink of extinction. It also legendary as being one of the last remnants of the Seventy Mile Bush. The Seventy Mile Bush was a name I occasionally came across but didn’t fully appreciate what it was until I started reading about William Colenso and his mycological collecting there:

IN the autumn of this year I again sent a lot of Fungi to Kew, London (with other plants, both Phænogams and Cryptogams), which I had discovered at various times during the last four years in my visits to the dense forests and deep glens of the Seventy-mile Bush district, County of Waipawa [Colenso, 1890]

The Seventy Mile Bush [from Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand]

The Seventy Mile Bush [from Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand]

A forest lost

The Seventy Mile Bush was a huge area of dense forest stretching from Masterton to central Hawkes Bay and across the east coast. Most of it was cleared for farming. In the 1870s the New Zealand Government bought the 942 ha Mt Bruce block as a forest reserve [administered by the Forest Service], with 55 ha being designated a native bird reserve under the control of the Wildlife Service. The government restructures of the late 1980s saw many of the government agencies responsible for conservation rolled into a single Department of Conservation which became responsible for the reserves.

Five Mile Avenue, circa 1875, Eketahuna [photo James Bragge, from Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa]

Five Mile Avenue, circa 1875, Eketahuna [photo James Bragge, from Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa]

In 2001 the entire Mt Bruce block, of 942 ha, was reunited into a single reserve. And then in 2013, its running passed to a community based charitable trust – The Pukaha Mount Bruce Board is a charitable trust.

Bioblitz 2016

In late February of this year, Pukaha Mount Bruce held a bioblitz. I was going to go and help along with some other mycologist, Barbara Paulus and Di Batchelor. But because of the drought, we decided it would better to wait until the autumn. Barbara and I finally got to there 5 June and here is what we found that day [note that I still have some work to do on the identifications].

The fungi

Mycena sp. in tawa forest – on a fallen log. Note: Maybe close to Marie Taylor’s Mycena dorotheae.

Mycena sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena pura (?) in tawa forest growing in leaf litter.

Mycena pura ? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena pura ? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma acutum in tawa forest on a fallen log. Note: Rubbish photo, sorry.

2016.06.11 Hypholoma acutum

Hypholoma acutum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma brunneum in tawa forest – on a fallen log. Note: on the same log as Hypholoma acutum.

Hypholoma brunneum [photo Geoff Ridley}

Hypholoma brunneum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena roseoflava in tawa forest – on a stump.

Mycena roseoflava [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena roseoflava [photo Geoff Ridley]

Nidula candida in tawa forest – on fallen wood.

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

Gyronemma sp. in tawa forest – on rotten tree fern rachis.

Gyronemma sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Gyronemma sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Armillaria novae-zealandiae in tawa forest – on fallen logs.

Armillaria novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Armillaria novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Armillaria novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Armillaria novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera in tawa forest – on fallen branches. Note: The orange colour has washed out in the photo.

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Crinipellis procera in tawa forest – on leaf and twig litter.

Crinipellis procera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Crinipellis procera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hygrophorus sp. in tawa forest amongst litter.

Hygrophorus sp [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hygrophorus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp. in tawa forest – on leaf litter.

Psathyrella [photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp. - black spore print [photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp. – black spore print [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena  mariae or parsonsii (?) in tawa forest – on stump.

Mycena mariae or parsonsii (?) [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena mariae or parsonsii (?) [photo Geoff Ridley]

Not sure what this is yet. In tawa forest in litter.

Not sure what this is. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Not sure what this is. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Not sure what this is. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Not sure what this is. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Xylaria sp. in tawa forest on a fallen log.

2016.06.11 Fingers

Xylaria sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hygrophorus sp. in tawa forest in litter.

Hygrophorus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hygrophorus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coral fungus in tawa forest amoungst litter. Note: I need to do some work on this yet.

Coral fungus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coral fungus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cyathus novaezelandiae in tawa forest on fallen wood.

Cyathus novaezelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cyathus novaezelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coprinellus disseminatus in tawa forest – on stump.

Coprinellus disseminatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coprinellus disseminatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Morganella compacta in tawa forest – on fallen log.

Morganella compacta [photo Geoff Ridley]

Morganella compacta [photo Geoff Ridley]

Leratiomyces erythrocephalus [= Weraroa erythrocephala] in tawa forest – in leaf litter.

2016.06.11 Leratiomyces

Leratiomyces erythrocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Conchomyces bursaeformis in tawa forest – on standing dead trunk.

Conchomyces bursaeformis [photo Geoff Ridley]

Conchomyces bursaeformis [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.06.11 Unknown 3

Conchomyces bursaeformis [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.06.11 Unknown 2

Conchomyces bursaeformis [photo Geoff Ridley]

Clavogaster novozelandicus Psilocybe weraroa [= Weraroa virescens] in tawa forest – in leaf litter.

Clavogaster novozelandicus [photo Geof Ridley]

Clavogaster novozelandicus [photo Geof Ridley]

Cortinarius sp. in red beech forest.

Cortinarius sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lepiota sp. in red beech forest – in leaf litter.

Lepiota sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lepiota sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hebeloma  mediorufum (?) in red beech forest.

Hebeloma  mediorufum (?) [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hebeloma  mediorufum (?) [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hebeloma mediorufum (?) spore print [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hebeloma mediorufum (?) spore print [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus in red beech forest.

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Cortinarius rotundisporus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Russula sp. in red beech forest.

Russula sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Russula sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Galerina patagonica in tawa forest – on fallen log.

Galerina patagonica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Galerina patagonica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Chalciporus piperatus in Douglas fir stand. Note:  Amanita muscaria also present but very rotten.

Chalciporus piperatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Chalciporus piperatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Futher reading 

Colenso, W. 1890. An enumeration of fungi recently discovered in New Zealand. Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute 23: 391-398.

 

 

 

 

Sunday stroll at Otari

2016.05.15 Waterfall track

Waterfall track [photo Geoff Ridley]

Torrential rain over the last week or so has finally ended the dry spell on the Wellington peninsular. A walk around the upper part of Otari-Wilton’s Bush found a few old friends and some new finds.

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] – There were a few of these small red Mycena was growing on wood chips just below the Cockayne Lookout. Not a great photo.

2016.05.15 Mycena

Mycena viscidocruenta [photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca] – There were a couple of good specimens and some very over mature ones as well on wood chips below the Cockayne Lookout. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Stropharia 1

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.05.15 Stropharia 2

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

The common scabbarb [Volvariella gloiocephalus]. This was also growing in the wood chip mulch in the gardens below the Cockayne Lookout.

2016.05.15 Volvariella

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

The potted logger [Galerina nana]  – This was growing around a recently transplanted Chatham Island forget-me-not or kopakopa [Myosotidium hortensia]. It was growing from the edge of the potting mix surrounding the plant. I have only collected this species once before and that was growing on soil in a potted plant in Rotorua. This is a new species for Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

2016.05.15 Galerina

Galerina nana [photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown birdsnest [Crucibulum laeve] – Growing on wood chips in the Brockie Rock Garden.

2016.05.15 birdsnest

Crucibulum laeve [photo Geoff Ridley]

A Panaeolina possibly Panaeolina foeniseci ? –  This was growing through a divaricating Coprosma with a small low growing herb in the Brockie Rock Garden. It had a hygrophanous cap and mottled gills and was up to 4-4.5cm in diameter.

2016.05.15 Paneolus 1

Panaeolina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.05.15 Paneolus 2

Panaeolina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Common dreamer [Psilocybe subaeruginosa] – commonly found growing on wood chips in urban areas, pine tree plantations and woody debris in forests and gardens.

2016.05.15 Paneolus 3

Psilocybe subaeruginosa [photo Geoff Ridley]

Sulphur pinkgill [Entoloma sulphureum]  – This was growing in the wood chips under the kauri and rimu by the information centre. There was only one fruitbody and it was past its best.

2016.05.15 Entoloma

Entoloma sulphureum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Favolaschia

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala] – This was growing on wood chips in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn and in the Brockie Rock Garden. The crinkly appearance is a result of drying out due to a strong northerly wind.

2016.05.15 Coprinus

Parasola leiocephala [photo Geoff Ridley]

Sociable inkcap [Coprinellus disseminatus] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn.

2016.05.15 Coprinus 2

Coprinellus disseminatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Auricularia

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

A little-gilled conch with dark brown spores [Melanotus sp.]. Growing on a fallen branch in the Fernery. It looks similar to the one seen at Zealandia a few weeks ago

2016.05.15 Melanotus

Melanotus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae] – This species fruits routinely on a number of logs in the bush between the Fernery and the car park.

2016.05.15 Lentinus

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

A helmet [Mycena sp.] – This little Mycena was growing on very rotten wood on the Waterfall track.

2016.05.15 Mycena 2

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Otari-Wilton’s Bush Annual Foray, 24 April 2016

Wellington has been very dry in the weeks leading up to the Foray and despite the heavy downpour last night there is not a lot around.

Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca [scarlet roundhead]. A perennial find at Otari. Read more about Leratiomyces ceres.

Leratomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Agaricus sp. [a mushroom] – Growing next to the boardwalk, at the north end of the Visitor’s Centre, at the base of a rimu. We first recorded this at Otari during the 2013 Foray.

Agaricus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Agaricus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Nidula candida [white birdsnest]. A common find on woodchip mulch around the gardens.

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

Nidula candida [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Galerina sp [a helmet]. A small brown spored mushroom growing on the woodchip mulched path in the fernery. Note the distinctive ring on the stem.

Galerina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Galerina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Postia sp. [a woody bracket]. See comments on Postia in last weeks blog.

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Auricularia cornea [wood ear jelly]. A common wood decay fungus. Read more about the wood ear jelly.

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Favolaschia calocera [orange poreconch]. A common wood decay fungus at this time of the year.

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Hypholoma fasciculare [a woodtuft]. Another wood decay fungus which is also often found on woodchip. Here it was on a log edging the path in the fernery.

Hypholoma fasciculare [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma fasciculare [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Agrocybe parasitica [tree swordbelt]. A common heart rot fungus of living tawa. This particular tree produces two or three flushes of mushrooms each year. To see Agrocybe parasitica as unopen caps look at last weeks blog.

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Also seen in the fernery were:

Back to Otari – Wilton’s Bush, 16 April 2016

Otari - Wilton's Bush [photo Geoff Ridley]

Otari – Wilton’s Bush [photo Geoff Ridley]

In preparation for the Fungal Foray at Otari Wilton’s Bush next weekend Rachel and I went and had a look to see what was fruiting. It has been a dry summer and autumn in Wellington so I wasn’t expecting to see much, so was surprised at what we did find.

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca]. A wood decay fungus growing on mulch in the gardens below the Cockayne lawn.

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

The common scabbarb [Volvariella gloiocephalus]. This was also growing in the wood chip mulch in the gardens below the Cockayne lawn.

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Fomes hemitephrus Postia sp. is a woody bracket. This is my best guess for this specimen as I find identifying brackets very frustrating. It was growing on a fallen tree at the edge of the Fernery. My friend Peter Buchanan, a mycologist at Landcare Research, took the bait and has given a better identification than I could. See Peter’s comments below.

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Postia sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Artist’s porebracket [Ganoderma applanatum]. A young specimen growing from a tree stump and has yet to take on the form of a bracket.

Ganoderma applanatum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Ganoderma applanatum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea]. These mushrooms were growing on a log used to edge the paths in the Fernery. The Fernery is irrigated so these fungi have not been so affected by the dry conditions.

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]. This was also growing on a log used for edging the path in the Fernery.

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma fasciculare [a woodtuft] growing on a log edging the garden in the fernery

Hypholoma fasciculare [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma fasciculare [photo Geoff Ridley]

These two mushrooms were growing in the leaf litter in the Fernery under puriri [Vitex lucens] and wheki-ponga [Dicksonia fibrosa]. I’ll get back to you on this.

Not sure about this? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Not sure about this? [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]. This cluster of your mushrooms was in a cleft at the base of a tawa  [Beilschmiedia tawa]. This particular tawa, in the Fernery, produces a crop of mushrooms every year.

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]. A mature cluster on a tawa but the dry northerly wind has desiccated them. This tawa was on the Circular walk just below the Wilton Bowling Club.

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

Garlic shanklet [Mycetinis curraniae].  We normally find this small mushroom growing on the bark of a living totara [Podocarpus totara] just by the information centre. However, these were growing on kanaka [Kunzea ericoides] on the Circular walk just below the Wilton Bowling Club.

Mycetinis curraniae [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycetinis curraniae [photo Geoff Ridley]

The last fungus is the icicle tooth [Hericium coralloides]. The photo was sent to me yesterday by Rewi Elliot who is the manager at Otari – Wilton’s Bush. It is a wood decay fungus and was collected by a visitor to the reserve. Rewi did not know what tree species it had been growing on.

Hericium coralloides [photo Rewi Elliot]

Hericium coralloides [photo Rewi Elliot]