School holidays at Zealandia

I had the chance to help with Zealandia’s school holiday programme on the 24th April (see my previous blog from 2016). The weather has been all over the place so while there where fungi to find they were few in number.

Zealandia staff members use Nature Watch to record what they find at Zealandia and this includes the holiday programme. Here are two groups being shown how to upload photos to Nature Watch before we hit the bush. All of these fungi were found along the Te Mahanga Track between the lower and upper reservoirs.

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Not a great photo of this little wood decay mushroom. It’s got me stumped at the moment. I had thought Heimiomyces neovelutipes but the stipe is too smooth and the gill too white I think.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Hypholoma fasciculares [photo Geoff Ridley]

We only saw one fruitbody of Psilocybe weraroa. Not a great photo of this very pale blue secotioid fungus.

Psilocybe weraroa [photo Geoff Ridley]

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

A nice little group of Cyathus striatus – This larger birds nest is easy recognised by the dark brown hairy cup with a shiny fluted interior.

Cyathus striatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

I’m guessing a Mycena but only saw the one and I don’t have a specimen.

Mycen? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Another tiny white Mycena. Looking at the stipe of the larger fruitbody in the second photo I’m thinking Mycena austrororida.

Mycena austrororida? [photo Geoff Ridley]

Mycena austrororida? [photo Geoff Ridley]

These little Mycena were growing deep inside a hole in the trunk of a standing living tree.  It is similar to Jerry Cooper’s  Mycena sp. ‘Ahuriri Reserve (PDD80918)’. See also my find of this from Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

Mycena sp. ‘Ahuriri Reserve’ [photo Geoff Ridley]

The next two photos are what is probably a little Lepiota growing in the litter around the base of a fern. It has a white spore print.

Lepiota [photo Geoff Ridley]

Lepiota [photo Geoff Ridley]

Advertisements

Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Sunday 11 May 2014

Another brilliant Sunday, 11 May 2014, at Otari-Wilton’s Bush. This is my fifth foray here this autumn and I am still finding species that I have not seen before.

???????????????????????????????

Porcelain slimecap [Oudemansiell australis] and wood-ear jelly – These species were growing on dead karaka trees, read more here.

???????????????????????????????

In the plant collection garden I made three collections of Psathyrella which I think represent three different species. The first was growing on woodchip mulch. The first is the red-edged roundhead [Psathyrella corrugis = Panaeolus sp. see here]. If you turn the cap upside down and look at the gill edges through a hand lens then the edges should look reddish-brown compared to the rest of the gill. I find it best to do this with sunlight on the gills.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

The second species was also on woodchip with the caps a little more conical then the red-edged roundhead and the gill edges are the same colour as the rest of the gill and lack the reddish colouring. This appears very similar to Psathyrella conopila.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

The third Psathyrella species was larger and growing in a crevice in the greywacky rock. However this bank had a woodchip mulched garden above and a woodchip mulched path below. This may be a native species.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Here are the three species black spore prints with the native Psathyrella species on the left, Psathyrella corrugis in the middle, and Psathyrella conopilaon the right.

???????????????????????????????

This sturdy little parasol (Lepiota sp.) keeps turning up on the woodchip mulch but I still do not have a name for it.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

This much bigger Lepiota was coming up in several clumps in the woodchips. It is the spiny parasol [Lepiota aspera] and I have only seen it once before growing in a chicken run in the Western Hutt hills

17 Otari 2014.05.11

21 Otari 2014.05.11

???????????????????????????????

This little yellow mushroom was growing on the woodchip mulched path. It looks a bit like Leucocoprinus fragilissimus however that species has a ring on its stem and there was no sign of one here. [Note added 22 May 2014: I need to open my eyes as this specimen clearly has brown spores and puts this in Bolbitius and probably Bolbitius vitellinus.]

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Weeping widow [Lacramaria lacrymabunda] – Growing on woodchips.

???????????????????????????????

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] – This small red Mycena was growing on woodchips.

???????????????????????????????

This is a species of Gymnopus. It looks very like a Californian species known as Gymnopus “stinkii” and the European Gymnopus brassicolens. It can be recognised by the brown caps with a very pale margin and tough blackish stems.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Charcoal flycap [Amanita nothofagi] – Beneath black beech [Nothofagus solandri].

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cocoa bolete [Tylopylus brunneus ] – Beneath black beech [Nothofagus solandri].

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Red-flushed bolete [Xerocomus nothofagi] – The red-flushed bolete was growing under kanaka [Kunzea ericoides].

???????????????????????????????

Hygrocybe blanda [orange waxgill] – growing in leaf litter in the fernery.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala] – This big troop of brown-umbrella inkcaps were growing on woodchip under a dense clump of ferns.

???????????????????????????????

Olive honeycap [Armillaria novaezelandae] – growing on a living tree in the Fernery.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – small pure white parasol found in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]- The mushrooms are about 3 meters above the ground on tawa [Beilschmiedia tawa].

???????????????????????????????

Bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes] – growing on rotten wood.

???????????????????????????????

Native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae] – This is the biggest fruiting of native shiitake that I have seen at Otari.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis ] at the base of a mamaku / tree fern [Cyathea medullaris] in a grove of mamaku.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Brown-blood helmet [Mycena mariae] – Growing on a dead branch. When the stem is broken it oozes a brown sap.

???????????????????????????????

Jelly-stemmed helmet [Mycena austrororida] – Growing on a dead branch.

???????????????????????????????

Blue-eyed helmet [Mycena interrupta] – Growing on a rotting log.

???????????????????????????????

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]

84 Otari 2014.05.11

Skull puffball [Calvatia craniiformis] – Growing in leaf litter.

???????????????????????????????

Antrodiella zonata [= Irpex brevis] – This wood decay fungus forms small brackets or flat sheets on the underside of rotting logs. Hanging vertically from the brackets are square-ish flat teeth and it is on these teeth that the spores are produced.

???????????????????????????????

And finally lichens growing on rocks in the alpine garden.

92 Otari 2014.05.11