Sunday stroll at Otari

2016.05.15 Waterfall track

Waterfall track [photo Geoff Ridley]

Torrential rain over the last week or so has finally ended the dry spell on the Wellington peninsular. A walk around the upper part of Otari-Wilton’s Bush found a few old friends and some new finds.

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] – There were a few of these small red Mycena was growing on wood chips just below the Cockayne Lookout. Not a great photo.

2016.05.15 Mycena

Mycena viscidocruenta [photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca] – There were a couple of good specimens and some very over mature ones as well on wood chips below the Cockayne Lookout. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Stropharia 1

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.05.15 Stropharia 2

Leratiomyces ceres [photo Geoff Ridley]

The common scabbarb [Volvariella gloiocephalus]. This was also growing in the wood chip mulch in the gardens below the Cockayne Lookout.

2016.05.15 Volvariella

Volvariella gloiocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

The potted logger [Galerina nana]  – This was growing around a recently transplanted Chatham Island forget-me-not or kopakopa [Myosotidium hortensia]. It was growing from the edge of the potting mix surrounding the plant. I have only collected this species once before and that was growing on soil in a potted plant in Rotorua. This is a new species for Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

2016.05.15 Galerina

Galerina nana [photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown birdsnest [Crucibulum laeve] – Growing on wood chips in the Brockie Rock Garden.

2016.05.15 birdsnest

Crucibulum laeve [photo Geoff Ridley]

A Panaeolina possibly Panaeolina foeniseci ? –  This was growing through a divaricating Coprosma with a small low growing herb in the Brockie Rock Garden. It had a hygrophanous cap and mottled gills and was up to 4-4.5cm in diameter.

2016.05.15 Paneolus 1

Panaeolina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

2016.05.15 Paneolus 2

Panaeolina sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Common dreamer [Psilocybe subaeruginosa] – commonly found growing on wood chips in urban areas, pine tree plantations and woody debris in forests and gardens.

2016.05.15 Paneolus 3

Psilocybe subaeruginosa [photo Geoff Ridley]

Sulphur pinkgill [Entoloma sulphureum]  – This was growing in the wood chips under the kauri and rimu by the information centre. There was only one fruitbody and it was past its best.

2016.05.15 Entoloma

Entoloma sulphureum [photo Geoff Ridley]

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Favolaschia

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala] – This was growing on wood chips in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn and in the Brockie Rock Garden. The crinkly appearance is a result of drying out due to a strong northerly wind.

2016.05.15 Coprinus

Parasola leiocephala [photo Geoff Ridley]

Sociable inkcap [Coprinellus disseminatus] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn.

2016.05.15 Coprinus 2

Coprinellus disseminatus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] – Growing on log used to edge garden in the Fernery below the Kauri Lawn. Read more about this species here.

2016.05.15 Auricularia

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

A little gilled conch with dark brown spores [Melanotus sp.]. Growing on a fallen branch in the Fernery. It looks similar to the one seen at Zealandia a few weeks ago

2016.05.15 Melanotus

Melanotus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae] – This species fruits routinely on a number of logs in the bush between the Fernery and the car park.

2016.05.15 Lentinus

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

A helmet [Mycena sp.] – This little Mycena was growing on very rotten wood on the Waterfall track.

2016.05.15 Mycena 2

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Mycena sp. [Geoff Ridley]

Advertisements

2015 Fungal Foray, Otari-Wilton’s Bush, 25-26 April 2015

Seventy(!) or so people met for the annual fungal foray walk through Otari-Wilton’s Bush today, Sunday 26 April 2015. And it was a typical Wellington day – windy and overcast.

000 2015.04.25

A track at Otari-Wilton’s Bush [photo Geoff Ridley]

Garlic shanklet [Mycetinis curraniae]

001 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp.

002 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Grey-gilled chalkcap [Russula inquinata]

003 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

 A small grey Mycena sp. on old punga

004 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] note the cluster of three tiny white Mycena sp.

005 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta]

006 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown birdsnest [Crucibulum leave]

007 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Haresfoot inkcaps [Coprinopsis lagopus]

008 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

A mushroom [Agaricus sp.]

009 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp.

010 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala]

011 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca]

012 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Galerina sp.

013 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Possibly a roundhead Psathyrella microrhiza

014 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Possibly a roundhead Psathyrella microrhiza

015 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] and, although not in the picture, there was a single mushroom of the  porcelain slimecap [Oudemansiella australis].

032 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Sociable inkcap [Coprinellus disseminatus]

016 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

A mushroom [Agaricus sp.]

018 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]

017 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes]

019 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]. These specimens had seen better days but one eagle yeyed little bou spotted a nice fresh specimen.

020 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Native shiitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae]

021 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – small pure white parasol

028 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet pouch [Weraroa erythrocephalus = Leratiomyces erythrocephalus]

029 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella conopila

030 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis ]

022 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Giant-bush parasol [Macrolepiota clelandii]

027 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea]

023 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] young

024 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

Crepidotus fuscovelutinus, my best guess at the moment, growing alongside the wood-ear jelly

025 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

026 2015.04.25

[photo Geoff Ridley]

[photo Geoff Ridley]

[photo Geoff Ridley]

031 2015.04.25

Metrosideros fulgens [photo Geoff Ridley]

 

 

 


Otari-Wilton’s Bush, 19 April 2015

Had my first foray to Otari-Wilton’s Bush last Sunday, 19 April 2015. The drought has broken but the rain has been episodic and torrential so not the best to the best conditions for mushrooms.

This small mushroom, the garlic shanklet [Mycetinis curraniae] is a perennial find  growing on the bark of a living totara [Podocarpus totara] just by the information centre.

01 2015.04.19

Mycetinis curraniae [photo Geoff Ridley]

 A single mushroom of a small white parasol [Lepiota sp.] growing at the base of a totara [Podocarpus totara].

02 2015.04.19

Lepiota sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

02b 2015.04.19

Lepiota sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

Only a few centimetres from the white parasol was this buff coloured parasol [Lepiota sp.] with a scaly cap. I have recorded this one before but still have no name for it. [Note 27 June 2015: Cystolepiota, possibly C. hetieri]

03 2015.04.19

Lepiota sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Near the Information Centre there is a stand of karaka [Corynocarpus laevigatus] which were ringbarked two or three years ago. These standing dead trees have produced large fruitings of wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea]

04 2015.04.19

Auricularia cornea [photo Geoff Ridley]

 There was a small group of grey-gilled chalkcap [Russula inquinata], a mycorrhizal species, growing under black beech [Nothofagus solandri]. Taste is a useful characteristic to separate Russula species tasting either acrid/hot/peppery or mild. The grey-gilled chalkcap is mild. [Note 27 June 2015: This might also be Russula griseobrunnea]

05 2015.04.19

Russula inquinata [photo Geoff Ridley]

06 2015.04.19

Russula inquinata [photo Geoff Ridley]

 All through the mulched gardens where harefoot inkcap [Coprinopsis lagopus]

07 2015.04.19

Coprinopsis lagopus [photo Geoff Ridley]

The orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera] are only just begin to fruit and not as extensively as in previous years.

08 2015.04.19

Favolaschia calocera [photo Geoff Ridley]

Just off the track in the fernery I came across these small Melanotus sp. on dead branches.

09 2015.04.19

Melanotus sp. [photo Geoff Ridley]

There is one particular log that regularly produces bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes] however there was only one poor specimen on it this time.

10 2015.04.19

Heimiomyces neovelutipes [photo Geoff Ridley]

These big but old tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica] were growing out of the base of a tawa [Beilschmiedia tawa].

11 2015.04.19

Agrocybe parasitica [photo Geoff Ridley]

The big log off the track near the fernery continues to produce its perennial crop of native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae].

12 2015.04.19

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

13 2015.04.19

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Weeping widow [Lacramaria lacrymabunda].

14 2015.04.19

Lacramaria lacrymabunda [photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet pouch [Weraroa erythrocephalus = Leratiomyces erythrocephalus]

15 2015.04.19

The little white spored mushroom was growing on woodchips. At this stage I haven’t worked out what it is.

16 2015.04.19

? [photo Geoff Ridley]

17 2015.04.19

? [photo Geoff Ridley]

 This little helmet was growing in the litter in the bush near the fernery. For want of a better name to give it I am going to tentatively refer it to Mycena parabolica as described by Marie Taylor.

18 2015.04.19

Mycena parabolica [photo Geoff Ridley]

19 2015.04.19

Mycena parabolica [photo Geoff Ridley]

 I don’t normally record bracket fungi but this bright orange Pycnoporus coccineus caught my attention.

20 2015.04.19

Pycnoporus coccineus [photo Geoff Ridley]

 The tea chalkcap [Russula novae-zelandiae] is mycorrhizal and was growing under kanaka [Kunzea ericoides].

21 2015.04.19

Russula novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

22 2015.04.19

Russula novae-zelandiae [photo Geoff Ridley]

 This is the bush giant parasol [Macrolepiota clelandii] and the first time that I have seen it at Otari-Wilton’s Bush. It was growing in a small  group under tawa and rewa rewa [Beilschmiedia tawa and Knightia excels]

23 2015.04.19

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Geoff Ridley]

24 2015.04.19

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Geoff Ridley]

25 2015.04.19

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Geoff Ridley]

26 2015.04.19

Macrolepiota clelandii [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis ]

27 2015.04.19

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Geoff Ridley]


Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Sunday 11 May 2014

Another brilliant Sunday, 11 May 2014, at Otari-Wilton’s Bush. This is my fifth foray here this autumn and I am still finding species that I have not seen before.

???????????????????????????????

Porcelain slimecap [Oudemansiell australis] and wood-ear jelly – These species were growing on dead karaka trees, read more here.

???????????????????????????????

In the plant collection garden I made three collections of Psathyrella which I think represent three different species. The first was growing on woodchip mulch. The first is the red-edged roundhead [Psathyrella corrugis = Panaeolus sp. see here]. If you turn the cap upside down and look at the gill edges through a hand lens then the edges should look reddish-brown compared to the rest of the gill. I find it best to do this with sunlight on the gills.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

The second species was also on woodchip with the caps a little more conical then the red-edged roundhead and the gill edges are the same colour as the rest of the gill and lack the reddish colouring. This appears very similar to Psathyrella conopila.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

The third Psathyrella species was larger and growing in a crevice in the greywacky rock. However this bank had a woodchip mulched garden above and a woodchip mulched path below. This may be a native species.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Here are the three species black spore prints with the native Psathyrella species on the left, Psathyrella corrugis in the middle, and Psathyrella conopilaon the right.

???????????????????????????????

This sturdy little parasol (Lepiota sp.) keeps turning up on the woodchip mulch but I still do not have a name for it.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

This much bigger Lepiota was coming up in several clumps in the woodchips. It is the spiny parasol [Lepiota aspera] and I have only seen it once before growing in a chicken run in the Western Hutt hills

17 Otari 2014.05.11

21 Otari 2014.05.11

???????????????????????????????

This little yellow mushroom was growing on the woodchip mulched path. It looks a bit like Leucocoprinus fragilissimus however that species has a ring on its stem and there was no sign of one here. [Note added 22 May 2014: I need to open my eyes as this specimen clearly has brown spores and puts this in Bolbitius and probably Bolbitius vitellinus.]

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Weeping widow [Lacramaria lacrymabunda] – Growing on woodchips.

???????????????????????????????

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] – This small red Mycena was growing on woodchips.

???????????????????????????????

This is a species of Gymnopus. It looks very like a Californian species known as Gymnopus “stinkii” and the European Gymnopus brassicolens. It can be recognised by the brown caps with a very pale margin and tough blackish stems.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Charcoal flycap [Amanita nothofagi] – Beneath black beech [Nothofagus solandri].

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cocoa bolete [Tylopylus brunneus ] – Beneath black beech [Nothofagus solandri].

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Red-flushed bolete [Xerocomus nothofagi] – The red-flushed bolete was growing under kanaka [Kunzea ericoides].

???????????????????????????????

Hygrocybe blanda [orange waxgill] – growing in leaf litter in the fernery.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala] – This big troop of brown-umbrella inkcaps were growing on woodchip under a dense clump of ferns.

???????????????????????????????

Olive honeycap [Armillaria novaezelandae] – growing on a living tree in the Fernery.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – small pure white parasol found in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]- The mushrooms are about 3 meters above the ground on tawa [Beilschmiedia tawa].

???????????????????????????????

Bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes] – growing on rotten wood.

???????????????????????????????

Native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae] – This is the biggest fruiting of native shiitake that I have seen at Otari.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis ] at the base of a mamaku / tree fern [Cyathea medullaris] in a grove of mamaku.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Brown-blood helmet [Mycena mariae] – Growing on a dead branch. When the stem is broken it oozes a brown sap.

???????????????????????????????

Jelly-stemmed helmet [Mycena austrororida] – Growing on a dead branch.

???????????????????????????????

Blue-eyed helmet [Mycena interrupta] – Growing on a rotting log.

???????????????????????????????

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]

84 Otari 2014.05.11

Skull puffball [Calvatia craniiformis] – Growing in leaf litter.

???????????????????????????????

Antrodiella zonata [= Irpex brevis] – This wood decay fungus forms small brackets or flat sheets on the underside of rotting logs. Hanging vertically from the brackets are square-ish flat teeth and it is on these teeth that the spores are produced.

???????????????????????????????

And finally lichens growing on rocks in the alpine garden.

92 Otari 2014.05.11


Otari – Wilton’s Bush Fungal Foray 2014

Previous Otari-Wilton’s bush forays: 2011, 2012, and 2013. Below are photos and comments on fungi seen over the last two days, 26-27 April.

Porcelain slimecap [Oudemansiell australis] and wood-ear jelly – These species were growing on dead karaka trees, read more here. Most of the dead trees were heavily colonised by the wood-ear jelly but one was largely colonised by porcelain slimecaps.

???????????????????????????????

Olive-stemmed helmet [Mycena olivaceomarginata] – This is a small grassland species.
???????????????????????????????

Red-edged roundhead [Psathyrella corrugis] – No  photo but read more about this species here [as Panaeolus sp.].

Grey-gilled chalkcap [Russula inquinata] – This a mycorrhizal species found growing in association with black beech [Nothofagus solandri]. Taste is a useful characteristic to separate Russula species tasting either acrid/hot/peppery or mild. The grey-gilled chalkcap is mild.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cocoa bolete [Tylopylus brunneus] – The cocoa bolete will, if in good condition blue when bruised or cut (see here).

???????????????????????????????

Sociable inkcap [Coprinellus disseminatus] – Growing on a beech stump.

???????????????????????????????

Smooth parasol [Leucoagaricus leucothites] – This species was growing in a garden mulched with gravel. There are a couple of photos of the smooth parasol I took in Marlborough last year here.

???????????????????????????????

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] – This small red Mycena was growing on woodchips. Young fresh specimens have a clear layer of slime on their stems but this disappears as the mushrooms age or if conditions are dry. The ruby helmet also occurs in Australia and there is an excellent photo, by Heino Lepp, at the Australian Botanic Gardens’ Australian Fungi website (here).

???????????????????????????????

Brown birdsnest [Crucibulum laeve] – Growing on woodchip.

???????????????????????????????

Fluted birdsnest [Cyathus striatus] – This larger birdsnest is easy recognised by the dark brown hairy cup with a shiny fluted interior. This is the first record of this species at Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Fragrant parasol [Lepiota  cristata] – Growing in woodchip and the first record of this species at Otari-Wilton’s Bush.

???????????????????????????????

A webcap [Cortinarius sp.] – This species took me by surprise by growing in a gravel bed as it is a mycorrhizal genus. A quick look around showed several kanuka trees within a couple of meters.

???????????????????????????????

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca] – Read more about this species here.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – One of many species of Lepiota present in New Zealand.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

A shanklet [Marasmius sp.] – This was growing on the bark of a living kahikatea [Dacrycarpus dacrydioides] in the podocarp / kauri grove by the information centre.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Garlic shanklet [Mycetinis curraniae] – Read more about this species here.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – Another parasol in need of a name.

???????????????????????????????

A mushroom [Agaricus sp.] – we recorded this unnamed Agaricus species for the first time at the 2013 foray. It was growing about 3 meters away, on the opposite side of the board walk from where it was found last year (see here).

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Olive honeycap [Armillaria novaezelandae] – The olive honeycap was growing on a moribund tree in the Fernery.

???????????????????????????????

Harefoot inkcap [Coprinopsis lagopus] – growing in wood chip mulch.

???????????????????????????????

Split gill [Schizophyllum commune] – this little wood decay was growing on logs used to edge the paths in the Fernery.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] – Read more about this species here.

???????????????????????????????

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera] – Read more about this species here.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – small pure white parasol found in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

Bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes] – I have recorded this species several times over the last two years growing on the same log.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Bluing pouch [Psilocybe weraroa = Weraroa novae-zelandiae] – We have known this little dirty white pouch fungus as a species of Weraroa for about 50 years. recent molecular research has seen this genus disestablished and its member species scattered amongst other genera. The placement of this species in Psilocybes is not surprising given the deep blue bruising that occurs when the cap is damaged as can be seen in the photo.

???????????????????????????????

Native shitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae] – This species fruits routinely on a number of logs in the bush between the fernery and the car park.

???????????????????????????????

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – A dark grey to slate blue capped parasol growing in wood chip in the Fernery.

???????????????????????????????

Common scabbard [Volvariella gloiocephala] – no photo

Still working on this little mushroom. Initially I tried to shoe horn it into Hydropus ardesiacus but it has a snuff brown spore print not a white one so I need to start again. It seemed to be growing on the frass in the centre of this cut stump rather than the wood.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis] – The cloudy funnelcap has been seen several times over the last few years at different places in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Tea chalkcap [Russula novae-zelandiae] – I collected this for the first time a week ago  and is recognised by its yellowish brown cap, its  mild taste, and it’s association with kanaka [Kunzea ericoides]

???????????????????????????????

A doilycap [Pluteus sp.] – I managed to get a very faint but distinctly pinkish/brick spore print from this specimen but not sure what, if any described, species it is.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Parachute conch [Campanella tristis] – growing on a well decayed branch in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Addendum 4 May 2014

Rita Urry, who was on the foray, sent me the following photos which she took at Otari the following weekend.

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]

???????????????????????????????

Icicle tooth [Hericium coralloides]

88 Otari 2014.05.04

Skull puffball [Calvatia craniiformis ] – see here for more information.

89 Otari 2014.05.04

 


Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Sunday 9 March 2014

View across Otari on a Sunday morning.

View across Otari on a Sunday morning.

Last Sunday, 9 March 2014, I made my first trip to Otari-Wilton’s Bush for this years fungal season. Despite a cool dry summer there were a few larger fungi about. These were mostly wood decay fungi as this substrate tends to hold water longer than leaf litter or the soil. The only exception was a parasol mushroom, Lepiota sp., growing in the thick litter below a stand of mixed podocarps and kauri by the information centre.

Lepiota sp. under podocarps and kauri.

Lepiota sp. under podocarps and kauri.

Lepiota sp.

Lepiota sp.

Many of the paths below the Cockayne Lawn and Lookout have been freshly mulched with wood chip and in the deeper damper patches haresfoot inkcaps, Coprinopsis lagopus, was fruiting.

03 Coprinus 09iii14

Coprinopsis lagopus

In the Fernery a few orange poreconch, Favolaschia calocera, were growing on small dead branches mixed in the leaf litter.

Favolaschia calocera

Favolaschia calocera

Tree species making up the canopy above the Fernery includes tawa (Beilschmiedia tawa) a hardwood species. Several trees had Agrocybe parasitica fruiting on their trunks. Agrocybe parasitica is a heart rot fungus.

Agrocybe parasitica

Agrocybe parasitica

A little brown fungus, possibly the bush shank, Heimiomyces neovelutipes, was found on a well decayed log in the Fernery.

Galerina sp.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes

Galerina sp.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes

The native shiitake, Lentinellus novae-zelandiae, was fruiting on rotting logs just behind the carpark at the edge of the Fernery.

Lentinula novae-zelandiae

Lentinuellus novae-zelandiae

On the Circular Walk track that leads down the hill from the Fernery to the Kaiwharawhara stream a single fruit body of the white porcelain slimecap, Oudemansiell australis, was growing on the well decayed branches of a fallen hinau (Elaeocarpus dentatus). This pure white mushroom was difficult to photograph so there is not a lot of detail present.

Oudemansiella australis

Oudemansiella australis

A few metres further down the track was another decaying tree trunk with wood-ear jelly, Auricularia cornea, growing on the damper underside.

Auricularia cornea

Auricularia cornea


Otari – Wilton’s Bush Fungal Foray 2013

You can read more about Otari-Wilton’s Bush from the foray report for 2011 and 2012, and at the Otari Wilton’s Bush website.

This last summer has been notable in being dry and followed by a reasonably wet autumn (see The drought has broken). So there were plenty of fungi around for the foray, 25-26 May 2013. Below is the list of what we did see.

Otari garden – an exhibition garden of low growing New Zealand native plants but not native to the local area) mulched with wood chips.

Lepiota sp. [a parasol] – this was in the garden under Nothofagus solandri. This is the first collection of this species at Otari.

???????????????????????????????

Leratiomyces ceres [scarlet roundhead] – on wood chip. For more on this mushroom go to my blog here.

Weraroa erythrocephala [scarlet pouch] – in the wood chip mulch and in litter in mixed forest.

???????????????????????????????

Clitocybe nebularis [cloudy funnelcap] – not so much in the garden as down the bank in the bush. Large mushrooms up 25cm diameter and usually in groups or even arranged in arcs in the bush.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Lacramaria lacrymabunda [weeping widow] – solid mushrooms, with a shaggy surface, mottled blackish kills, and a fibrous ring at top of stem. This is the first collection of this species at Otari.

???????????????????????????????

???????????????????????????????

Beech (Nothofagus) grove – this grove was planted as beech is not native to the Wellington peninsular. We haven’t in the past found much here but being a month later there is a lot more to be seen.

Russula acrolamellata [ugly chalkcap]. This mushroom has a brown to golden cap and white stem. Like all chalk cap the stem snaps when bent. If you are prepared to chew a little of the gill tissue on the tip of your tongue it should be quite hot hence the name acrolamellata or acrid gills. We also saw it under kanuka.

???????????????????????????????

Amanita nothofagi [charcoal flycap] – this is an mycorrhizal species which means it is only found growing on the roots of southern beech or teatree. It is related to the scarlet flycap, with its red cap and white warts, seen under pines. Several mushrooms were present.

???????????????????????????????

Coprinellus (Coprinus) disseminatus [sociable inkcap] – A common inkcap found growing on dead wood in all kinds of habitats.

???????????????????????????????

Tylopylus brunneus [cocoa bolete] – Last collected here in 2011. This bolete bruises blue-grey.

???????????????????????????????

I put the cut fruitbody, from above, on paper to dry and the fluid from it seeped into paper where it has reacted with the air and turned the classic blue of this reaction.

???????????????????????????????

Circular walk from Information Centre – this is an area of original broadleaf-podocarp forest but with an underplanted collection of plants that would be expected in this type of forest.

Micromphale sp. [garlic shanklet] – on bark of living totara. If you cup on of these mushroom in your hands and put your hands over your nose you can smell the distinct odour of gallic.

???????????????????????????????

Agaricus sp. [a mushroom] – Growing next to boardwalk in kauri litter. Tall brown mushroom. This is the first collection of this species at Otari. This is very similar to Marie Taylor’s collection GMT737 (PDD84327) which she collected in 1972 from under kauri in Northcote, Auckland.

??????????????????????????????? 84327c???????????????????????????????

Lepiota sp. [a parasol] – This was growing under totara.

??????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????

Mycena pura [lilac helmet] – This distinctive lilac mushroom was growing in the leaf litter.

??????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????

Favolashia calocera (orange poreconch) – on fallen branches.

Agrocybe parasitica [tree swordbelt] – on living hardwood.

Agrocybes parasitica 2013

Heimiomyces neovelutipes [bush shank] – Growing on decaying wood.

??????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????

Armillaria novaezelandae [olive honeycap] – on rotten wood.

???????????????????????????????

Mycena sp. [a helmet] – A very dark coloured Mycena growing on wood. It is similar to Ian Hoods figure 143. It also looks like Jerry Cooper’s  Mycena sp. ‘Ahuriri Reserve (PDD80918)’.

???????????????????????????????

Lentinellus novae-zelandiae [bush shiitake] – on rotting log.

???????????????????????????????