He harore rangi tahi

He harore rangi tahi – a mushroom only lasts a single day *

What might be true for mushrooms is not true about emails and txts. Here are some of the fungi that people have asked me about.

Wellington Botanic Garden 10.07.2016

Lea Robertson asked if I had seen the bolete under the maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), below the herb garden, at the Wellington Botanic Garden. I wandered up there at lunchtime and there was a good, but now slightly old, flush of Suillus luteus [slippery-jack bolete].

Suillus luteus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Suillus luteus [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wellington’s Central Park 01.07.2016

Lea had asked earlier about an ‘earthball’ she had seen in Wellington’s Central Park. The photo she sent was a typical Scleroderma verrucosum. See more photos of Scleroderma verrucosum in my earlier blog.

Scleroderma verrucosum [photo Lea Robertson]

Scleroderma verrucosum [photo Lea Robertson]

Wood chips 24.06.2016

Eoin was seeking an identification of an LBM (little brown mushroom) he found growing on wood chip in his back garden. He described it as ‘tan brown with a wee nipple on top’, and stem as the ‘same colour as the cap’. Identifying LBMs is always a challenge especially from a photo. My best guess was it was a Galerina species, as they were fruiting in my garden at the same time. I thought it might be somewhere around Galerina nana.

Galerina sp. [photo Eoin]

Galerina sp. [photo Eoin]

Galerina sp. [photo Eoin]

Galerina sp. [photo Eoin]

Island Bay 13.06.2016

Olwen Mason reminded about the purple funnelcaps [Lepista nuda] that came up in here Island Bay garden in 2014 and that there were more now. She said that they weren’t as purple as last time and wondered whether they would colour-up as they aged.

Waikanae 11.06.2016

Brian Ward asked if I could identify the mushrooms that come up in his Waikanae garden (Kapiti coast) each year. He said that they grew in the plum and oak leaf litter. Brian also said that they were identical to ones he saw under totara trees in Otaki.

Brian had made an attempt at an identification using books and thought maybe it was a ‘chantarel’. Given the typical gills run down the stem (decurrent) it wasn’t too bad an attempt. He also admitted that he had eaten them in previous years without ill effects. It is what we have been calling in New Zealand the cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis].

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Brian Ward]

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Brian Ward]

This is the best fit for the New Zealand species but it might yet prove to be something else especially as molecular studies are carried out in Europe. In Europe Clitocybe nebularis is considered edible.

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Brian Ward]

Clitocybe nebularis [photo Brian Ward]

Waitarere 9.06.2016

Jim Waters sent me his observations on fungi in pine plantations at Waitarere Beach. “As indicated the display has been impressive over the last few weeks. I was particularly interested in the brown upright rubbery fungi with sort two part, almost like leaves, growing … all round one Pinus radiata stump.” This threw me for a bit but I’m pretty sure that it is a false morel [Gyromitra infula] which Michael Kuo at MushroomExpert.com describes as “broadly lobed cap is usually pinched into two lobes, creating a saddle-shaped appearance”.

Gyromitra infula [photo Jim Waters]

Gyromitra infula [photo Jim Waters]

Jim also said “I thought the very small white fungus in another stump looked like the recently infamous Split gill, but was not sure. Very small (3-4mm) and looked very like a very small piece of the head of cauliflower, until it is turned over as demonstrated.” And yes I agree with Jim’s identification – split-gill [Schizophyllum commune].

Schizophyllum commune [photo Jim Waters]

Schizophyllum commune [photo Jim Waters]

“The third one was the large “puff ball” like structure which looked as if it had started to deflate, but very big.” And the puff ball is the skull puffball [Calvatia craniiformis].

Calvatia craniiformis [photo Jim Waters]

Calvatia craniiformis [photo Jim Waters]

References

* Makareti, 1938. The Old time Maori. Victor Gollancz, London

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2015 Fungal Foray, Otari-Wilton’s Bush, 25-26 April 2015

Seventy(!) or so people met for the annual fungal foray walk through Otari-Wilton’s Bush today, Sunday 26 April 2015. And it was a typical Wellington day – windy and overcast.

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A track at Otari-Wilton’s Bush [photo Geoff Ridley]

Garlic shanklet [Mycetinis curraniae]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp.

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Grey-gilled chalkcap [Russula inquinata]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

 A small grey Mycena sp. on old punga

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta] note the cluster of three tiny white Mycena sp.

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Ruby helmet [Mycena viscidocruenta]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown birdsnest [Crucibulum leave]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Haresfoot inkcaps [Coprinopsis lagopus]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

A mushroom [Agaricus sp.]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella sp.

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Brown-umbrella inkcap [Parasola leiocephala]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet roundhead [Leratiomyces ceres = Stropharia aurantiaca]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Galerina sp.

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Possibly a roundhead Psathyrella microrhiza

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Possibly a roundhead Psathyrella microrhiza

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] and, although not in the picture, there was a single mushroom of the  porcelain slimecap [Oudemansiella australis].

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Sociable inkcap [Coprinellus disseminatus]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

A mushroom [Agaricus sp.]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Orange poreconch [Favolaschia calocera]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Bush shank [Heimiomyces neovelutipes]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Tree swordbelt [Agrocybe parasitica]. These specimens had seen better days but one eagle yeyed little bou spotted a nice fresh specimen.

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Native shiitake [Lentinellus novae-zelandiae]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

A parasol [Lepiota sp.] – small pure white parasol

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Scarlet pouch [Weraroa erythrocephalus = Leratiomyces erythrocephalus]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella conopila

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Cloudy funnelcap [Clitocybe nebularis ]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Giant-bush parasol [Macrolepiota clelandii]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood-ear jelly [Auricularia cornea] young

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

Crepidotus fuscovelutinus, my best guess at the moment, growing alongside the wood-ear jelly

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

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[photo Geoff Ridley]

[photo Geoff Ridley]

[photo Geoff Ridley]

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Metrosideros fulgens [photo Geoff Ridley]