Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Sunday 9 March 2014

View across Otari on a Sunday morning.

View across Otari on a Sunday morning.

Last Sunday, 9 March 2014, I made my first trip to Otari-Wilton’s Bush for this years fungal season. Despite a cool dry summer, there were a few larger fungi about. These were mostly wood decay fungi as this substrate tends to hold water longer than leaf litter or the soil. The only exception was a parasol mushroom, Lepiota sp., growing in the thick litter below a stand of mixed podocarps and kauri by the information centre.

Lepiota sp. under podocarps and kauri.

Lepiota sp. under podocarps and kauri.

Lepiota sp.

Lepiota sp.

Many of the paths below the Cockayne Lawn and Lookout have been freshly mulched with wood chip and in the deeper damper patches haresfoot inkcaps, Coprinopsis lagopus, was fruiting.

03 Coprinus 09iii14

Coprinopsis lagopus

In the Fernery a few orange poreconch, Favolaschia calocera, were growing on small dead branches mixed in the leaf litter.

Favolaschia calocera

Favolaschia calocera

Tree species making up the canopy above the Fernery includes tawa (Beilschmiedia tawa) a hardwood species. Several trees had Agrocybe parasitica fruiting on their trunks. Agrocybe parasitica is a heart rot fungus.

Agrocybe parasitica

Agrocybe parasitica

A little brown fungus, possibly the bush shank, Heimiomyces neovelutipes, was found on a well-decayed log in the Fernery.

Galerina sp.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes

Galerina sp.

Heimiomyces neovelutipes

The native shiitake, Lentinellus novae-zelandiae, was fruiting on rotting logs just behind the carpark at the edge of the Fernery.

Lentinula novae-zelandiae

Lentinuellus novae-zelandiae

On the Circular Walk track that leads down the hill from the Fernery to the Kaiwharawhara stream a single fruit body of the white porcelain slimecap, Oudemansiell australis, was growing on the well-decayed branches of a fallen hinau (Elaeocarpus dentatus). This pure white mushroom was difficult to photograph so there is not a lot of detail present.

Oudemansiella australis

Oudemansiella australis

A few metres further down the track was another decaying tree trunk with wood-ear jelly, Auricularia cornea, growing on the damper underside.

Auricularia cornea

Auricularia cornea

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