From harbour to hills

It is a week before Christmas and we have been having wet humid weather so after doing some Christmas shopping this morning I walked home from the central city home to Northland. The harbinger of Christmas are the pohutukawa [Metrosideros excela] which are beginning flowering all through the city. These are by the Civic Centre near the harbour foreshore.

Pohutukawa in flower, central city [photo Geoff Ridley]

Pohutukawa in flower, central city [photo Geoff Ridley]

 On the edge of the central business district is the Bolton Street Memoral Park. Back in May I lamented the removal of a stump that I had been recording the fungi on. Well you can’t keep a good fungus down and although the stump had been removed most of the major roots are still in place. This photo shows Crumble inkcap [Coprinellus micaceus] grow on a dead root.

Coprinus on dead tree root [photo Geoff Ridley]

Coprinellus micaceus [photo Geoff Ridley]

 In the fuchia garden that runs along the edge of the main garden and Glenmore St there was a clump of roundhead [Psathyrella] possibly Psathyrella conophila see earlier blog. These little roundheads are common on wood mulch.

Psathyrella conopila [photo Geoff Ridley]

Psathyrella conopila [photo Geoff Ridley]

02 Psathyrella conopila

Psathyrella conopila [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Close to the roundhead was a disintegrating Common scabbard [Volvariella gloiocephala = V. speciosa].

 

Volvariella [photo Geoff Ridley]

Volvariella gloiocephala [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Near the west entrance near the intersection of Glenmore St and Orangi Kaupapa Rd there is the fallen oak [Quercus robur] which has been mulched under to control weeds. There was a good fruiting of scarlet pouch [Weraroa erythrocephalus = Leratiomyces erythrocephalus] see earlier blog.

Wood mulch under the fallen oak [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wood mulch under the fallen oak [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wearoa fruit bodies grown on the mulch [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wearoa fruit bodies grown on the mulch [photo Geoff Ridley]

Weroa [photo Geoff Ridley]

Weraroa erythrocephalus [photo Geoff Ridley]

 Leaving the Botanic Garden and begin the climb up Orangi Kaupapa Rd this Ganoderma applanatum was grown on a stump just below the intersection with Garden Rd. All around the footpath here is a thick mat of the invasive weed Tradescantia fluminensis which can be seen in the photo.

Ganoderma apllanatum (photo Geoff Ridley]

Ganoderma apllanatum (photo Geoff Ridley]

Almost home. Looking back from Garden Rd across the Botanic Garden to the city and harbour.

Pohutukawa in flower, central city [photo Geoff Ridley]

Wellington [photo Geoff Ridley]


Bolton Street Memorial Park (5)

As we move towards late spring and early summer in the southern Pacific mushrooms are few and far between as conditions become dryer. The bit of rain that we had last weekend and early in the week produced this flush of crumble inkcap [Coprinellus micaceus]. Although appearing to be growing on soil the wood decay fungus is growing from the dead root of a near by tree [pohutukawa, Metrosideros excelsa].

crumble inkcap 1 2014.10.29

Crumble inkcap [photo Geoff Ridley]

crumble inkcap 2 2014.10.29

Crumble inkcap [photo Geoff Ridley]

Crumble inkcap [photo Geoff Ridley]

Crumble inkcap [photo Geoff Ridley]


Tulip fire

A feature of spring in Wellington is tulip day at the Botanic Garden. According to the Friends of the Wellington Botanic Garden tulip day started in the 1940s. It is possible that the first tulip day was 16 October 1944 from information supplied by the Wellington City Archive however it became a significant event in 1948 following a donation of tulip bulbs by the Netherland’s government as a thank you for sheltering children during WWII. The gardeners plant about 24,000 bulbs for the spring display.

Tulip Sunday 1948 [photo Friends of the Wellington Botanic Garden]

Tulip Sunday 1948 [photo Friends of the Wellington Botanic Garden]

Since moving back to Wellington last year I walk to work through the main garden and have watched the preparation, planting, and the emergence of the tulips over the last few months. At the end of last week large area of tulips in one bed were removed and the bed mulched over.

Looking across the new mulch [photo Geoff Ridley, 18 September]

Looking across the new mulch [photo Geoff Ridley, 18 September]

Signs have been erected and articles in the local papers explain that this bed has been badly affected by the disease ‘tulip fire’ (Anon, 2014). The disease is caused by a fungus Botrytis tulipae which infects all parts of the plant causing grey to brown lesions which may join up to cause a general dieback of the emerging tulips.

Tulips with tulip fire [photo Geoff Ridley, 18 September]

Tulips with tulip fire [photo Geoff Ridley, 18 September]

For a disease to develop there needs to a pathogen (Botrytis tulipae), a susceptible host (tulip), and a favourable environment. This is known as the disease triangle.

The disease triangle [diagram University of Wisconsin-Madison]

The disease triangle [diagram University of Wisconsin-Madison]

In this case we have had the pathogen since before 1948 (Dingley, 1969) but do we have the other two factors? According to Cornell University’s fact sheet a favourable environment is “cool (15°C), rainy spring and summer weather … can be particularly damaging when rainy, drizzly weather continues over several days”. Well, that pretty much describes Wellington weather most of the time.

So, we have two of the factors for disease development. That just leaves a susceptible host? The Botanic Garden has been growing tulips annually in these flower beds for 70 years with a low incidence of disease. The tulip cultivar most affected is the bright pink ‘Carola’ which was planted for the first time last year. So here is our susceptible host.

‘Carola’ [photo Jacques Amand]

‘Carola’ [photo Jacques Amand]

Botanic Garden staff members removed many of the worst diseases plants to control the spread of the disease and intend to apply “a one-off fungicide to nip it in the bud” (Anon, 2014). While this will solve the immediate problem what other long term solutions are available? Then most obvious is to break the triangle and not grow susceptible cultivars such as ‘Carola’.

The second is to reduce the presence of the pathogen in the soil. Botrytis tulipae forms black survival bodies or sclerotia which survive in the soil when tulips are not present. 

Sclerotia of Botrytis tulipae [photo 5458101, Sandra Jensen, Cornell University, Bugwood.org]

Sclerotia of Botrytis tulipae [photo 5458101, Sandra Jensen, Cornell University, Bugwood.org]

These could be eliminated by treating the soil with fungicide or other chemicals but this is not environmentally friendly. The other approach is to implement crop rotation as you would do in a vegetable garden. Interestingly there is not much written about this and I found only one article about in the Otago Daily Times (2014):

Crop rotation in the flower garden is also possible. Stocks and wallflowers in mass displays exhaust the soil in similar ways and should not follow each other. Likewise, if dahlias are grown in the same soil year after year, they will make excessive demands on some soil elements and plant quality will drop. Ideally, dahlias, gladioli, pansies, violas, tulips, hyacinths and narcissi should be planted in different areas of the garden each year. Rose-planting time has arrived and nurseries soon will be full of this most popular shrub.

The challenge in gardening is to work with natural processes to achieve the desired outcome. Look forward to seeing you at Tulip Sunday 21 September 2014 – enjoy the flowers and understand the fungus.

References

Amand, J. The tulip gallery. http://www.thetulipgallery.com/view/859

Anon, 2014. Council gardeners fight fire for tulip Sunday. Independent Herald (Wellington, 17 September 2014): 18.

Cornell University, 2013. Botrytis blight of tulip. Plant Disease Diagnostic Clinic. http://plantclinic.cornell.edu/factsheets/botrytisblighttulip.pdf

Dingley, J.M. 1969. Records of Plant Diseases in New Zealand. DSIR Bulletin No. 192. Government Printer: Wellington, New Zealand.

Friends of the Wellington Botanic Garden. Tulips. http://friendswbg.org.nz/newTULIPS.htm

Jensen, S. 2012. Mycelial neck rot. Cornell University, Bugwood.org http://www.insectimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5458101

Otago Daily Times, 2014. Crop rotation important for healthy garden. 27 June 2014. http://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/home-garden/307255/crop-rotation-important-healthy-garden

Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, General Master Gardener Training. The disease triangle. http://www.plantpath.wisc.edu/PDDCEducation/ppt/img1.php

Post script

The photo below was taken 7 October when the last of the disease affected ‘Carola’ tulips had been removed from yhe infected bed. What was left was the ‘Black Diamond’ cultivar which is obviously has a resistance to the pathogen.

Disease resistant 'Black Diamond' tulips [photo Geoff Ridley]

Disease resistant ‘Black Diamond’ tulips [photo Geoff Ridley]


Mushrooms on toast

My first recollection of eating field mushrooms [Agaricus bisporus] collected from cattle paddocks just outside of Shannon in 1968. What I recall most about the meal was the ample black liquid that they cooked in and how it turned the toast grey and soggy. This reminiscence was prompted by an article in the business pages of the Dominion Post (Harris 2014) about Clive Thompson, owner of Parkvale Mushrooms in Carterton. Parkvale Mushrooms sells 7-8 tonnes of mushroom a week as well as 50 tonnes of used compost a week and an annual turnover of $3.2m.

Clive Thompson, Parkvale Mushrooms [photo Caleb Harris]

Clive Thompson, Parkvale Mushrooms [photo Caleb Harris]

 New Zealand has 7 commercial mushroom growers producing 8,500 tonnes of mushrooms annually which are worth $41.1 million in domestic sales (Fresh Facts, 2013). Our biggest producer, Meadow Mushrooms in Christchurch, produces on average 147 tonnes of mushrooms a week.

Consumer spending
Because fruit rots so easily in a fruit bowl and bread goes mouldy in the bag growing mushrooms should be easy. All you need to do is introduce the fungus to the compost, let it rot and out will pop the mushrooms! Biology is never quite that simple. There is a great article although a little old now written by Stephen Brightwell in New Zealand Geographic in 1993 about commercial mushroom production. For a more recent description see the Mushroom Growers Federation NZ’s website.
The basic process is shown in this diagram from Brightwell (1993).

Mushroom cultivation timeline [Brightwell 1993]

Mushroom cultivation timeline [Brightwell 1993]

Compost is made from wet straw, animal manure (usually chicken), and gypsum (calcium sulphate). In a large operation like Meadow Mushrooms the wet straw is heaped into rows and a machine used to turn the composting straw to keep it aerated which helps to maintain a temperature of 65–80°C and to speed decomposition. At this high temperature carmelisation occurs where water is driven out and carbon is concentrated and the compost has a strong smell of ammonia. This is the end of phase I composting.

Mechanical compost turning at Meadow mushrooms, Christchurch

Mechanical compost turning at Meadow mushrooms, Christchurch

In phase II composting the compost is kept warm and aerated to promote a second bloom of microorganisms and cause the buildup of heat which will pasteurise the compost. Pasteurisation effective kills any unwanted pests and pathogens of mushrooms. In the cool down period following pasteurisation an array of microorganism flourish which convert any remaining ammonia into protein and other nitrogen compounds the mushroom can use. This is called conditioning of the compost.

When the composts temperature drops to 30°C it is inoculated with fungal spawn. Spawn is made by growing the fungus on cooked rye or other seed. When the seed has been fully colonised by the fungus it is mixed with the compost and the fungus grows out through, colonising, the compost.

Left to right: a pure fungal culture in a Petri dish, a flask of rye grain that has been inoculated, and a flask that has been fully colonised [photo Pen State University]

Left to right: a pure fungal culture in a Petri dish, a flask of rye grain that has been inoculated, and a flask that has been fully colonised [photo Pen State University]

The colonised compost is then packed into wooden, stackable trays or onto long metal shelves in mushroom shed where temperature and humidity are controlled for optimal colonisation of the compost. Once this occurs the trays or shelves are cased. Casing is putting a 4-5cm layer of peat and lime across the surface of the compost.

Stacked wooden trays of inoculated compost, Te Mata Mushroom []

Stacked wooden trays of inoculated compost, Te Mata Mushroom [photo The Profit]

When the casing has been colonised the sheds’ environment is regulated to control the levels of carbon dioxide, humidity and air temperature. Under these controlled conditions mushrooms begin to form. Generally 3 or 4 flushes can be expected over 4-6 weeks.

Button mushrooms pushing up through the casing [photo Te Mata Mushrooms]

Button mushrooms pushing up through the casing [photo Te Mata Mushrooms]

Once picked the mushrooms are ready for eating. Richard Till’s (2011) recipe is probably as close as it gets to what I remember as a kid.

Mushrooms on toast

Mushroom on toast [photo Jim Rice]

Mushroom on toast [photo Jim Rice]

 50g butter
½ cup flour
250ml milk
1.5kg cleaned field mushrooms
(or flat cultivated mushrooms)
Salt, pepper

Melt butter in a large saucepan.
Add flour and stir over a low heat for two minutes.
Add milk and whisk together over a medium heat until the mixture thickens. It will be very thick. Add one teaspoon of salt.
Roughly chop, or crumble the mushrooms into the white sauce, and mix together.
Cover and reduce heat to low. Stir frequently.
The mushrooms will release liquid and the mixture will become quite watery. Remove cover and cook for a further 30 minutes to an hour, until the mixture is thick.
Check seasoning.
Allow to cool and, if possible, refrigerate overnight.
Reheat and serve on thick slices of buttered toast.

References

Brightwell S 1993. Feasting on fungi. New Zealand Geographic 18 (June): 34-58. http://www.nzgeographic.co.nz/archives/issue-18/feasting-on-fungi

Fresh Facts 2013. http://www.freshfacts.co.nz/file/fresh-facts-2013.pdf

Harris C 2014. Dream mushrooms into 43m venture. The Dominion Post (1 September 2014): B5. http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/small-business/10444484/Dream-mushrooms-into-3m-venture

Mushroom Growers Federation New Zealand. Myshroom growing process. http://www.mushroomgrowers.org.nz/mushroom-growing-process.php

Parkvale Mushrooms http://www.parkvale.co.nz/index.php

The Profit 2013. Mushroom magic. http://www.theprofit.co.nz/mushroom-magic/

Till R 2011. Man about the land: Magic mushrooms. Sunday Star Times (10 April 2011): E19.

 


The purple funnelcap – Lepista nuda

Olwen Mason wrote to me that she had found some mushrooms (4 August) in her garden “near a manuka [Leptospermum scoparium] tree and are entirely purple in the stem, gills and cap and give a creamy white spore print. I think they must be a russula but I haven’t found anything that exactly describes them.”

Based on Olwen’s suggestion that it was a Russula I said it might be Russula macrocystidiata and asked her to send me a photo as the purple gills did not sound right for a Russula.

Lepista nuda cap and stem [photo Olwen Mason]

Lepista nuda cap and stem [photo Olwen Mason]

Lepista nuda gills [photo Olwen Mason]

Lepista nuda gills [photo Olwen Mason]

Olwen’s photos show a typical purple funnelcap [Lepista nuda] also known as a blewit. The purple colour is strongest in the young fruit bodies with the purple fading and the cap becoming brown with age. The purple colouring persists in the gills and stem.

Lepista nuda spore print [photo Olwen Mason]

Lepista nuda spore print [photo Olwen Mason]

Olwen also said “I’m surprised by the spore print here which looks more brown/rust than I remembered. I looked at the original and it is the same as the photo so it’s my memory that is at fault.” Her spore print shows the spores to be a buff to pinkish buff. The literature is a bit confusing with some saying the spore print is “whitish buff with possibly a slightly pinkish tint”, “tan to buff spore print”, “light (white to pale pink)”, and “pale pink”.

Tom Volk at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse writes:

Some systematists place Clitocybe nuda into the genus Lepista, because of its tan to buff spore print. However in almost every other way it is a Clitocybe. We accept many shades of spore color in genera like Russula and Pleurotus, so I think we can accept a slight variation in spore color in Clitocybe - I prefer to follow Howard Bigelow, who wrote a monograph of the genus Clitocybe, and use the name Clitocybe nuda. You are free to use Lepista nuda if you like, but I am basically a “lumper.”

While not abundant the purple funnelcap is probably widespread in parks and gardens throughout New Zealand. There is a photo of it from the Wellington Botanic Garden collected in May this year.

Reference

Volk T 1998. Tom Volk’s Fungus of the Month for November 1998. University of Wisconsin-La Crosse http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/nov98.html


The layerd cup – Peziza varia

Rita Urry sent me photos of these cup fungus, the layered cup, she saw at Otari-Wiltons Bush (21 July 2014) growing on wood chips near the main entrance. I have blogged about this fungus before – Post quake mushrooms.

Layered cup [photo Rita Urry]

Layered cup [photo Rita Urry]

 Although this is a small specimen they can get up to 10cm in diameter and with a broad point of attachment to the material it is growing on. They are also often in groups. The fruit bodies are whitish to pale yellow brown but may become pale brown to chestnut brown (Ginns, 1980).

Layered cup [photo Rita Urry]

Layered cup [photo Rita Urry]

 The common name, layered, refers the layers that can be seen in the tissue when it is cut and examined under a hand lens.

References

Ginns, J. 1980. Peziza varia. Fungi Canadenses 169: 1-2.


Hochstetter’s blue pinkgill

Latin binomials can be scary enough to the beginner but when those names are the Latinised words from other languages it is even scarier. Take as an example the New Zealand blue pinkgill, Entoloma hochstetteri. Whoa! Where did that name come from and how do you say it? Most can cope with the Entoloma part of the name but in a predominantly English speaking nation why hochstetteri and how do you say it? The simplest pronunciation, although German speakers will shudder, is hock-shtetter-ree.

Christian Gottlieb Ferdinand von Hochstetter

Christian Gottlieb Ferdinand von Hochstetter

The blue pinkgill is named in honour of Christian Gottlieb Ferdinand von Hochstetter. Hochstetter was an Austrian geologist and naturalist who visited New Zealand in 1858 to 1860 (Fleming 1990, The Prow 2009). Although his work here was mainly geological he also made notes on natural history including fungi. On returning to Vienna he passed his notes including a drawing of this fungus to the mycologist Erwin Reichardt who describe it as Cortinarius hochsetteri in 1866.

For the first 60 years of the twentieth century there was almost no taxonomic investigation of the mushrooms of New Zealand. This drought was broken by a series of publication by Dr Greta Stevenson who in 1962 re-determined the blue pinkgill as Entoloma hochstetteri. Below is a plate from the 1962 paper with the blue pinkgill lower middle of the plate and numbered 7. The colours are muted due to the poor reproduction from the original art work by the printer and this was a great disappointment to Dr Stevenson.

Assorted Entoloma [Stevenson, 1962]

Assorted Entoloma [Stevenson, 1962]

Dr Stevenson’s papers kicked-off a new interest in mushrooms and further popularised through two small pictorial field guides by Marie Taylor. Below are Marie’s original water colours on which the illustrations in her books were based.

Entoloma hochstetteri [Marie Taylor}

Entoloma hochstetteri [Marie Taylor}

These books brought awareness of the blue pinkgill to a much bigger audience and it became the ‘must find’ of new forayers. Mary Smiley wrote of her quest for the blue Entoloma of New Zealand in the American magazine Fungi. Mary wrote – crawling through the mud, wet leaves, sticker bushes, on my belly like a Navy Seal on a combat mission but all the while thinking “This is so much fun, I don’t ever want it to end!” and “… there were blue Entolomas everywhere …”.

In the late 1980s the New Zealand Reserve Bank decided to completely revamp our banknotes. After wide consultation with the public the reverse side of the fifty dollar notes now features Pureora forest, the kokako (the blue wattled crow), supplejack whose fruits are eaten by kokako, and the blue pinkgill. As far as I know this is the only currency to feature a mushroom.

New Zealand $50 note

New Zealand $50 note

The reason for putting the blue pinkgill on the fifty dollar note is artistic in that the blue of the mushroom is similar to the blue wattles of the kokako. The similar colours was also noted by the Tuhoe people who call it werewere kokako or literally the kokako’s wattle (Best, 1942).

In 2002 New Zealand Post issued a set of stamps featuring native fungi with Entoloma hochstetteri on the 80c stamp. This was the first set of New Zealand stamps to feature fungi. The photos were taken by Don Horne.

NZ Post's 80c [photo Don Horne]

NZ Post’s 80c [photo Don Horne]

Our interest in the blue pinkgill is possibly about to go culinary. The Metabolomics lab at the University of Auckland has been researching biological pigments to replace non-biological pigments used as food colourings. As they note:

Food colouring now represents a $1.2 billion global market, with natural colours capturing 31% of the food market, but growing at a rate of 5%. However, these natural colours are largely plant extracts that have the disadvantage of variability and seasonal supply. Microbial cell production, in contrast, offers a reliable and scalable pigment production technology.

Entoloma species are very difficult to grow in artificial culture but the Metaboloic Lab now has the blue pinkgill in culture. It still has to be determined whether or not it has toxic or psychoactive properties. If it hasn’t then one day we may see kokako blue lollies or cosmetics.

Extracted pigment from Entoloma hochstteri

Extracted pigment from Entoloma hochstteri

The lead researcher Silas Villas-Boas jokes “that if it is edible, blue mushroom risotto could become an iconic New Zealand dish” (Gates, 2013) It would seem however that blue risotto is already a signature dish in Mallorca Spain and in Malaysia.

Risotto

Spanish blue risotto

Malaysian nasi ulam

Malaysian nasi ulam

P.S. 16 July 2014. How we almost lost Hochstetter’s blue pinkgill!

In 1976 Egon Horak studying Entoloma species from around the world concluded Entoloma hochstetteri and the Japanese species E.aeruginosum was the same as an older named species E.virescens. As a result Barbara Segedin noted in 1988 “Hygrophorus cyaneus Berkeley, later called Entoloma hochstetteri by Stevenson and now called E. virescens, described first from Bonin Is., Japan”. Then the Japanese mycologist Tsuguo Hongo (1990) visited New Zealand in the late 1980s and studied both Entoloma hochstetteri and the Japanese species Entoloma aeruginosum and decided that they represented different species thus saving the name for us.

 

References

Best E 1942. Forest lore of the Maori. The kokako or crow. http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-BesFore-t1-body-d2-d6-d16.html

Fleming CA 1990. Hochstetter, Christian Gottlieb Ferdinand von, (from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography). Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 30 October 2012. http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/biographies/1h30/hochstetter-christian-gottlieb-ferdinand-von

Gates C 2013. Mushrooms might yield major value. Stuff.co.nz http://www.stuff.co.nz/science/9354061/Mushroom-might-yield-major-value

Hongo T 1990. New and noteworthy agarics from New Zealand. Report from the Tottori Mycological Institute 28: 129-134.

Horak E 1976. On cuboid-spored species of Entoloma (Agaricales). Sydowia 28: 171-236.

Metabolomics Lab. Microbe-derived pigments. University of Auckland. http://www.metabolomics.auckland.ac.nz/index.php/home-top/14-projects-detail-cat/52-pigmentsdetail

New Zealand Post. Native fungi. http://stamps.nzpost.co.nz/new-zealand/2002/native-fungi

Reserve Bank of New Zealand. The history of banknotes in New Zealand. http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/notes_and_coins/notes/0094089.html

Segedin BP 1988. An historical view of the larger fungi. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 43: 23-24.

Smiley M 2010. Quest for the blue Entoloma of New Zealand. Fungi 3(4): 4-6. http://www.fungimag.com/fall-2010-articles/NewZealandLR.pdf

Stevenson G 1962. The Agaricales of New Zealand: III. Rhodophyllaceae. Kew Bulletin 16: 227-237 + plates 4-5.

The Prow 2009. Ferdinand Hochstetter (1829-1884). http://www.theprow.org.nz/people/ferdinand-hochstetter-1829-188/#.UpKDBF329D9


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